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What is U.L. 1562?

U.L. 1562 covers medium voltage dry-type transformers:

1.1 These requirements cover single-phase or three-phase, dry-type, distribution transformers, including solid cast and resin encapsulated transformers. The transformers are provided with either ventilated or non-ventilated enclosures and are rated for a primary or secondary voltage from 601 to 35000 V.

1.2 These transformers are intended for installation in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70.

1.3 These requirements do not cover the following transformers:

  1. Instrument transformers
  2. Step-voltage and induction voltage regulators
  3. Current regulators
  4. Arc furnace transformers
  5. Rectifier transformers
  6. Specialty transformers (such as rectifier, ignition, gas tube sign transformers, and the like)
  7. Mining transformers
  8. Motor-starting reactors and transformers

1.4 These requirements do not cover transformers under the exclusive control of electrical utilities utilized for communication, metering, generation, control, transformation, transmission, and distribution of electric energy regardless of whether such transformers are located indoors, in buildings and rooms used exclusively by utilities for such purposes; or outdoors on property owned, leased, established rights on private property or on public rights of way (highways, streets, roads, and the like).

  • What is the energy efficiency regulation compliance in the U.S. and Canada?

      In the past several years, there has been an accelerated rate of change in updating energy efficiency standards for transformers in North America.

      Governments in US and Canada are encouraging users to use higher energy efficiency dry-type transformers, to help reduce carbon dioxide emissions. There is also a long term cost savings in operating higher efficiency transformers translated in lower energy usage, lower cooling cost, etc.

      In U.S.A. the Department of Energy (DOE) has mandated new higher efficiency levels effective Jan. 1st 2016.

      In Canada Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) published SOR/2016-311 which amends the Energy Efficiency Act to align the via amendment 14 the minimum energy efficiency levels for dry type transformers to the ones implemented by DOE in Jan 2016.

      The new NRCan 2019 regulation is going to be enforced across Canada on May 1st, 2019. The Ontario government already adopted these new efficiency levels by publishing the ON Reg.404-12 which in schedule 6 defines the new energy efficiency levels that dry type transformers sold in ON must comply with starting Jan.1st 2018 (Ontario Energy Efficiency Compliance).

      The rest of Canada (including Quebec) is still following the current energy efficiency levels prescribed by CSA C802.2, until the new NRCan regulations come in effect on May 1st 2019.

      To help our valued customers in estimating the cost savings resulting from upgrading their old dry type transformer to the new DOE2016/NRCan2019 efficiency levels, HPS has developed an Energy Savings Calculator available on its website. To find out how HPS can help reduce your energy consumption, click here.

      To visit the Canadian Gazette for more information about the Canadian energy efficiency standards, click here.

      For the Ontario Energy efficiency regulation please click here.

      To view an electronic copy of the U.S. DOE energy efficient standards, click here.

  • What is a Dielectric System in a transformer?
  • What are the new Energy Efficiency levels coming for Transformers sold in the U.S.?

      Transformers have been and remain an essential part of our electrical infrastructure.  Everywhere we look there is a transformer supplying power to industrial, commercial or residential applications.

      In the past decades the greenhouse gas emissions and the effects on our planet have become the focus of many governments, agencies and individuals. Energy generation is a major contributor to the greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to widespread efforts to make energy generation more environmentally friendly, there is also a goal to lower energy consumption within most industrial, commercial and residential areas. Achieving increased energy efficiency levels for equipment and consumer products has become a priority for many manufacturers.

      Improving the energy efficiency of new transformers is a primary goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE), and they have the legal authority to define efficiency levels and enforce compliance.  Environmentally conscious consumers also recognize that buying a higher energy efficiency transformer will have a societal payback over many years.

      The Department of Energy has established new and more stringent Energy Efficiency levels for Transformers in the U.S. effective January 1st 2016.  The new efficiency levels for Medium Voltage Liquid-Filled, Medium Voltage and Low Voltage Dry-Type Distribution Transformers are defined in DOE’s CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) title 10 part 431.  Widely known as DOE 10 CFR p431, it was published in the Federal Register Vol. 78, No. 75 on Thursday April 18, 2013.  According to the DOE, the new efficiency levels are expected to reduce energy losses by an average of 18% in low-voltage dry-type distribution transformers and 13% for medium-voltage dry-type transformers, over the current TP-1 efficiency levels.

      To put the benefits of this change in perspective, the DOE projects savings up to $12.9 billion in total costs to consumers and 3.63 quadrillion Btu of energy over a 30 year period. In addition, about 265 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions will be avoided, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 52 million automobiles.

      The subject of energy efficiency for transformers raises two main considerations:

      1. Under normal operation a transformer is always on (typically at 35% average loading), making any energy efficiency improvements more significant over an extended period of time.  This means that customers will be rewarded in two manners:  they are reducing greenhouse gas emissions and there is an economic payback through reduced energy costs.  Considering the life expectancy of a transformer and the fact that the transformer will be on 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for the next 25-30 years, even small energy efficiency improvements will pay dividends for decades.  A secondary benefit is that more efficient transformers generate less heat, and in many cases this translates into lower costs to cool the environment in which they are utilized.
      2. The currently mandated energy efficiency levels are already hovering around the 98-99% mark, depending on the type of transformer and ratings.  This means that any further efficiency improvements become more challenging to achieve, typically requiring more and/or better core and conductor materials.  This will directly impact the cost of the transformer in most cases.  However, as noted in point 1 above, there is an economic benefit to offset the higher initial transformer costs.  The new DOE 2016 compliant transformers that will come on the market will also be somewhat heavier than the current TP-1 efficiency level transformers.

      Hammond Power Solutions (HPS) has an online Energy Savings Calculator to help to our customers determine the savings they can achieve by installing a higher efficiency transformer.  It includes a comparison of transformers with older efficiencies to those of higher efficiency (TP1, NEMA Premium and DOE 2016 in the future) as well as specifics of the application and the customer’s cost of energy.

      Currently, for applications that require higher energy efficiency than the DOE regulated TP-1 levels, industry is using Premium Efficiency transformers defined by the NEMA Premium Efficiency Guidelines that stipulate approximately 30% lower loses than the TP-1 levels.  In terms of the environmental benefits of using a NEMA Premium transformer over a TP-1 rated let’s look at an example:

      The Electricity savings resulting from upgrading one three phase 75 kVA transformer can be translated into one of the following:

      • 1.19 Metric Tons of CO2
      • 121 Gallons of Gasoline
      • About 1/6th of the energy used by an average household annually
      • Planting 28 Trees
      • 0.9 Acres of Forest
      • Recycling 0.34 Metric Tons of Waste
      • Savings of $166 per year at $0.12 per kW-Hr

      Forest image 

      At some kVA ratings NEMA Premium energy efficiency levels meet or slightly exceed the DOE 2016 levels, some are slightly below the new requirements.  However, the NEMA Premium products are optional within the market today, and many consumers do not take advantage of the benefits they afford.  Hence, the DOE will require that all transformers manufactured after January 1st, 2016 will meet the new efficiency levels.

      The environmental impact and savings for our customers resulting from the DOE changes are positive and significant.  HPS fully embraces and supports this change, and the environmental benefits our society will receive as a result.  We proudly offer high quality transformers meeting the most stringent Energy efficiency requirements today and will be in a position to support the migration to the new DOE 2016 higher-efficiency designs for our valued partners and customers, beginning in the latter half of 2015.

  • New Energy Efficiency levels US 2016

      Transformers have been and remain an essential part of our electrical infrastructure.  Everywhere we look there is a transformer supplying power to industrial, commercial or residential applications.

      In the past decades the greenhouse gas emissions and the effects on our planet have become the focus of many governments, agencies and individuals. Energy generation is a major contributor to the greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to widespread efforts to make energy generation more environmentally friendly, there is also a goal to lower energy consumption within most industrial, commercial and residential areas. Achieving increased energy efficiency levels for equipment and consumer products has become a priority for many manufacturers.

      Improving the energy efficiency of new transformers is a primary goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE), and they have the legal authority to define efficiency levels and enforce compliance.  Environmentally conscious consumers also recognize that buying a higher energy efficiency transformer will have a societal payback over many years.

      The Department of Energy has established new and more stringent Energy Efficiency levels for Transformers in the U.S. effective January 1st 2016.  The new efficiency levels for Medium Voltage Liquid-Filled, Medium Voltage and Low Voltage Dry-Type Distribution Transformers are defined in DOE’s CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) title 10 part 431.  Widely known as DOE 10 CFR p431, it was published in the Federal Register Vol. 78, No. 75 on Thursday April 18, 2013.  According to the DOE, the new efficiency levels are expected to reduce energy losses by an average of 18% in low-voltage dry-type distribution transformers and 13% for medium-voltage dry-type transformers, over the current TP-1 efficiency levels.

      To put the benefits of this change in perspective, the DOE projects savings up to $12.9 billion in total costs to consumers and 3.63 quadrillion Btu of energy over a 30 year period. In addition, about 265 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions will be avoided, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 52 million automobiles.

      The subject of energy efficiency for transformers raises two main considerations:

      (1) Under normal operation a transformer is always on (typically at 35% average loading), making any energy efficiency improvements more significant over an extended period of time.  This means that customers will be rewarded in two manners:  they are reducing greenhouse gas emissions and there is an economic payback through reduced energy costs.  Considering the life expectancy of a transformer and the fact that the transformer will be on 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for the next 25-30 years, even small energy efficiency improvements will pay dividends for decades.  A secondary benefit is that more efficient transformers generate less heat, and in many cases this translates into lower costs to cool the environment in which they are utilized.

      (2) The currently mandated energy efficiency levels are already hovering around the 98-99% mark, depending on the type of transformer and ratings.  This means that any further efficiency improvements become more challenging to achieve, typically requiring more and/or better core and conductor materials.  This will directly impact the cost of the transformer in most cases.  However, as noted in point 1 above, there is an economic benefit to offset the higher initial transformer costs.  The new DOE 2016 compliant transformers that will come on the market will also be somewhat heavier than the current TP-1 efficiency level transformers.

      Hammond Power Solutions (HPS) has an online Energy Savings Calculator to help to our customers determine the savings they can achieve by installing a higher efficiency transformer.  It includes a comparison of transformers with older efficiencies to those of higher efficiency (TP1, NEMA Premium and DOE 2016 in the future) as well as specifics of the application and the customer’s cost of energy.

      Currently, for applications that require higher energy efficiency than the DOE regulated TP-1 levels, industry is using Premium Efficiency transformers defined by the NEMA Premium Efficiency Guidelines that stipulate approximately 30% lower loses than the TP-1 levels.  In terms of the environmental benefits of using a NEMA Premium transformer over a TP-1 rated let’s look at an example:

      The Electricity savings resulting from upgrading one three phase 75 kVA transformer can be translated into one of the following:

      • 1.19 Metric Tons of CO2
      • 121 Gallons of Gasoline
      • About 1/6th of the energy used by an average household annually
      • Planting 28 Trees
      • 0.9 Acres of Forest
      • Recycling 0.34 Metric Tons of Waste
      • Savings of $166 per year at $0.12 per kW-Hr

      Dense Forest

       

      At some kVA ratings NEMA Premium energy efficiency levels meet or slightly exceed the DOE 2016 levels, some are slightly below the new requirements.  However, the NEMA Premium products are optional within the market today, and many consumers do not take advantage of the benefits they afford.  Hence, the DOE will require that all transformers manufactured after January 1st, 2016 will meet the new efficiency levels.

      The environmental impact and savings for our customers resulting from the DOE changes are positive and significant.  HPS fully embraces and supports this change, and the environmental benefits our society will receive as a result.  We proudly offer high quality transformers meeting the most stringent Energy efficiency requirements today and will be in a position to support the migration to the new DOE 2016 higher-efficiency designs for our valued partners and customers, beginning in the latter half of 2015.

  • What is ANSI C57.12.91?
  • What is ANSI C57.12.51?

      IEEE Standard for Ventilated Dry- Type Power Transformers, 501 kVA and Larger, Three-Phase, with High- Voltage 34.5 kV to 601 V and Low- Voltage 208Y/120 V to 4160 V covering General Requirements. The current standard was updated in 2008.

      This standard is intended to set forth characteristics relating to performance, limited electrical and mechanical interchangeability, and safety of the equipment described, and to assist in the proper selection of such equipment. Specific rating combinations are described in the range from 750/1000 to 7500/10 000 kVA inclusive, with high-voltage 601 to 34 500 volts inclusive and low-voltage 208Y/120 to 4160 volts inclusive. Part I of this standard describes certain electrical and mechanical requirements and takes into consideration certain safety features of 60-Hz, two-winding, three-phase, ventilated dry-type transformers with self-cooled ratings 501 kVA and larger, generally used for step-down purposes. Part Il describes other requirements or alternatives which may be specified for some applications and lists forced-air-cooled ratings for certain sizes.

  • What is an air terminal chamber (ATC) or line terminal compartment?

      This is an air filled terminal compartment, typically 12″-24″ wide that is bolted to one or both sides of a substation transformer. This typically contains either the primary or secondary connections with a steel barrier separating it from the larger chamber containing the actual transformer core and coil. The ATC may also contain additional connections for loop feeds and/or lightning arresters.

  • What are dust filters?

      Dust filters are placed over ventilation openings to mitigate dust accumulation within the transformer’s enclosure. Filters are typically made to be removable and washable. Care must be taken for regular maintenance since accumulating dust will limit airflow and reduce air cooling. For this reason, dust filters are typically avoided through using non-ventilated designs or moving the transformer’s location. Because of reduced airflow, transformers cannot be retrofitted with dust filters without derating or using fan forced venting.

  • What are solar transformers?

      Solar transformers covers a broad selection of transformers which are designed for the unique requirements of a solar power system. These transformers can include solar inverter transformers, grid tie transformers and zig-zag autotransformers or isolation transformers specially designed to be used in grounding banks for utility hook-ups. Transformers used to directly deliver power to utilities must often be capable of bidirectional current flow.

  • What is an incoming line interrupter switch (electrical disconnect)?

      This is typically a two position, three phase switch designed to disconnect a transformer on the line side. The switch may or may not also have fuses. The switch assembly is typically attached directly to the transformer enclosure and electrically connected through close coupled bussing.

  • What is a solar grounding bank?
  • What is a pad mounted transformer?

      A pad mounted transformer typically refers to a specific style of enclosure for larger transformers that is capable of being installed in areas accessible to the general public. The transformer will typically have features including tamper resistant construction, tamper proof bolts and screws, lockable compartments with hinged doors, bottom entry of primary and secondary cabling and baffled ventilation openings if applicable. These should not be confused with the general statement that electrical transformers are often installed on a concrete pad.

  • What are Medium Voltage Transformers and where are they used?

      Medium voltage transformers that have one or more windings above 1.2 k-volts. Ventilated medium voltage transformers up to 2500 kVA are covered by DOE 2016 efficiency regulation in the U.S.A. and up to 5000 kVA by NRCan 2019 efficiency regulations in Canada.

      They are primarily for use in stepping down medium voltage power to a lower operating voltage for commercial, institutional or industrial applications. However, medium voltage transformers may also be used to step-up voltage.

  • What does is a reconnectable transformer?

      A reconnectable transformer typically refers to a transformer with two primary connections. These may be used for mobile equipment, test transformers or to accommodate future voltage changes and upgrades in a facility without having to change the transformer. Depending on the difference in voltages and application reconnectable transformers may be exempt from current efficiency regulations.

  • What is a Unit Substation Style Transformer (USST)?
  • What is U.L. 1562?

      U.L. 1562 covers medium voltage dry-type transformers:

      1.1 These requirements cover single-phase or three-phase, dry-type, distribution transformers, including solid cast and resin encapsulated transformers. The transformers are provided with either ventilated or non-ventilated enclosures and are rated for a primary or secondary voltage from 601 to 35000 V.

      1.2 These transformers are intended for installation in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70.

      1.3 These requirements do not cover the following transformers:

      1. Instrument transformers
      2. Step-voltage and induction voltage regulators
      3. Current regulators
      4. Arc furnace transformers
      5. Rectifier transformers
      6. Specialty transformers (such as rectifier, ignition, gas tube sign transformers, and the like)
      7. Mining transformers
      8. Motor-starting reactors and transformers

      1.4 These requirements do not cover transformers under the exclusive control of electrical utilities utilized for communication, metering, generation, control, transformation, transmission, and distribution of electric energy regardless of whether such transformers are located indoors, in buildings and rooms used exclusively by utilities for such purposes; or outdoors on property owned, leased, established rights on private property or on public rights of way (highways, streets, roads, and the like).

  • What is ANSI C57.12.01?
  • What is rodent screening?

      Rodent screens are added over ventilation openings of transformers to prevent rodents from entering the compartment. Large transformers installed directly on concrete pads may also need a steel bottom added. Rodent screens will not prevent the entry of dust or insects.

  • What are High Voltage and Low Voltage windings?
  • What is the induction principle of transformers?

      A transformer consists of laminated silicon steel cores on which one or more coils of wire have been wound. The two windings are electrically isolated from each other (with the exception of autotransformers) and usually have widely different numbers of turns.

      If the transformer primary is connected to an A.C. power source of suitable voltage, a small no-load current called the exciting current will flow into the coil and produce a magnetic flux in the iron core. Since the source is A.C., the flux will also be alternating. This alternating magnetic flux links the secondary turns and induces a small voltage in each turn. The induced volts per turn of the secondary windings adds to appear across the secondary terminals. It should be understood that the flux induces a voltage in each primary turn equal to that in each secondary turn. The difference between the total induced primary voltage and the applied voltage is approximately equal to the IR drop. The ratio of turns between the primary and secondary coils determines the output voltage.

  • Are Harmonic Mitigating Transformers (HMT’s) available in medium voltage configurations?
  • Under what circumstance is D.C. Resistance Measurement needed?

      Current from a D.C. resistance bridge is applied to the transformers windings to determine the D.C. resistance voltage of the coils. This test is important for the calculation of transformer winding heat losses used for winding temperature testing, and as base data for future assessment in the field.

  • What Seismic ratings Does HPS Use?

      HPS units meet Risk Category IV (Ip=1.5) for Sds=2.0 per ASCE 7-16 (and equivalent factors in NBCC 2015) for ground-level installations only (z/h=0) for all locations in North America.

      HPS units can be designed to meet California OSHPD (Office of Statewide health Planning and Development) requirements. Please see the California OSHPD site for a listing of HPS transformers which have been tested and certified.

  • What is an Applied Voltage test?
  • What is an Induced Voltage test?

      The induced voltage test is applied for 7200 cycles or 60 seconds whichever is shorter. The voltage applied is twice the operating voltage, and confines the integrity of the insulation

  • What are Impedance Voltage and Load Loss tests?

      The voltage required to circulate the rated current under short-circuit conditions when connected on the rated voltage tap, is the impedance voltage. Rated current is circulated through the windings with the secondary short-circuited. The impedance voltage and load loss is measured. They are corrected to rise +20°C reference temperature.

      Note: This is a standard test only on units over 500kVA. It will only be carried out on lower kVA units when specifically requested.

  • What is a Polarity and Phase-Relation test for?

      Polarity and phase-relation tests are made to determine angular displacement and relative phase sequence to facilitate connections in a transformer. Determining polarity is also essential when paralleling or banking two or more transformers.

  • What is NEMA TP3?
  • What is NEMA ST 20?
  • What is NEMA TP2?

      NEMA TP2 defines how energy efficiency is measured. Typically, it uses a sinusoidal wave with no harmonics at unity (1.0) power factor at 35% load for 600 volt class units and 50% load for medium voltage units.

      This regulation has been replaced by similar test standards described in DOE 2016 and NRCan 2019 regulations.

  • What are Dielectric tests?

      The purpose of dielectric tests is to demonstrate that the transformer has been designed and constructed to withstand the voltages associated with specified insulation levels.

  • What is U.L. 1561?

      UL1561 covers 600 Volt Class Transformers:

      1.1 These requirements cover:

      1. General purpose and power transformers of the air-cooled, dry, ventilated, and non-ventilated types to be used in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. Construction types include step up, step down, insulating, and autotransformer type transformers as well as air-cooled and dry-type reactors

      OR

      1. General purpose and power transformers of the exposed core, air-cooled, dry, and compound-filled types rated more than 10 kVA to be used in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. Constructions include step up, step down, insulating, and autotransformer type transformers as well as air-cooled, dry, and compound-filled type reactors.

      1.2 These requirements do not cover ballasts for high intensity discharge (HID) lamps (metal halide, mercury vapor, and sodium types) or fluorescent lamps, exposed core transformers, compound-filled transformers, liquid-filled transformers, voltage regulators, general use or special types of transformers covered in requirements for other electrical equipment, autotransformers forming part of industrial control equipment, motor-starting autotransformers, variable voltage autotransformers, transformers having a nominal primary or secondary rating of more than 600 volts, or overvoltage taps rated greater than 660 volts.

      1.3 These requirements do not cover transformers provided with waveshaping or rectifying circuitry. Waveshaping or rectifying circuits may include components such as diodes and transistors. Components such as capacitors, transient voltage surge suppressors, and surge arresters are not considered to be waveshaping or rectifying devices.

  • What is Zone Classification?

      Obsolete versions of seismic standards used to classify seismic areas ranging from zone 0 to zone 4, where zone 0 indicates the weakest earthquake ground motion and zone 4 indicates the strongest. The zone classification is no longer used. The current standards specify the Sds design earthquake spectral response acceleration parameter as described above.

      Please refer link https://seismicmaps.org/ to determine the Sds criteria for a specific location.

  • Who Needs Seismic?

      Healthcare facilities and emergency response locations, including police stations and other vital government facilities, will often include a Seismic Certification requirement. Power generation stations may also have this requirement as well as facilities handling hazardous, toxic or explosive materials.

      To determine the Sds criteria for a specific location, the U.S. Geological Survey provides a utility on their website, which can be viewed at https://seismicmaps.org/

  • What are some of the Tests performed on transformers?

      Normal, routine production tests include:

      1. core loss;
      2. load loss – winding or copper loss;
      3. Impedance;
      4. hi-pot – high voltage between windings and ground;
      5. induced – double induced two times voltage.

      Optional special tests include:

      1. heat run – temperature testing;
      2. Noise tests – sound level measurement;
      3. impulse tests – BIL tests:
      4. partial discharge

  • How are Seismic Units Rated?

      Three criteria are typically defined for seismic units:  Sds, Ip, z/h.

      Sds = Design earthquake spectral response acceleration parameter at short periods (ASCE 7-16 Section 11.4.4 Design Spectral Acceleration Parameters).  The required motion coefficient is dependent on the facility’s location and soil type. Most of the United States requires Sds = 0.05 to 1.5g. Specific regions require an Sds = 2.0g such as along the Missouri state line south of Illinois and parts of California.

      Ip = Component Importance Factor (ASCE 7-16 Section 13.1.3 Component Importance Factor).  Ip is dependent on the function of the building in which the transformer is installed. Typically, an Ip is assumed to equal 1.5 for transformers expected to function continuously through and after an earthquake.

      z/h = A ratio of the height in the structure that the component has been anchored, to the overall height of the structure.  A value of z/h of 1.0 states that the component is capable of being installed anywhere within the structure (ASCE 7-16 Section 13.3.1 Seismic Design Force).

      z/h - a ratio of the height of the structure

  • What is Seismic Certified?

      A fair amount of construction projects require components to be “Seismic Certified.” A Seismic Certification ensures the component will withstand and operate after an event such as an earthquake. In addition to requiring structural components to meet specific seismic regulations, most jurisdictions also require non-structural components – including electrical systems – to be “Seismic Certified.”

      Seismic requirements are defined by the International Building Code 2018 and the California Building Code (2019). ASCE 7-16 is the base standard for many building codes, and is referenced by both IBC and the CBC.

      OSHPD, the Office of State-wide Health Planning and Development, requires actual “shake-testing” of products prior to allowing products to be specified for construction or retrofit projects anywhere in the state of California. This testing must be reviewed by a California state certified structural engineer. Without a widespread nationwide approval process, many other jurisdictions require the OSHPD Special Seismic Certification Preapproval (OSP) for projects.