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What is a Center Tap?

It is a center point of a two winding transformer or a true tap in the middle winding of a coil. The voltage from the neutral to the center point will equal the voltage from the center point to end of the coil.

For three phase units, the center tap is often limited to 5% of the total transformer kVA.

  • What are Primary Taps?

      Primary taps are additional terminals added to the primary winding that allows the customer to apply different supply voltages.  Primary taps can be provided as FCBN (Full capacity Above Nominal), or FCBN (Full Capacity Below Nominal).  The taps are generally below or above the nominal rated primary voltage in specific percentage increments provided by the customer.

  • What is U.L. 1562?

      U.L. 1562 covers medium voltage dry-type transformers:

      1.1 These requirements cover single-phase or three-phase, dry-type, distribution transformers, including solid cast and resin encapsulated transformers. The transformers are provided with either ventilated or non-ventilated enclosures and are rated for a primary or secondary voltage from 601 to 35000 V.

      1.2 These transformers are intended for installation in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70.

      1.3 These requirements do not cover the following transformers:

      1. Instrument transformers
      2. Step-voltage and induction voltage regulators
      3. Current regulators
      4. Arc furnace transformers
      5. Rectifier transformers
      6. Specialty transformers (such as rectifier, ignition, gas tube sign transformers, and the like)
      7. Mining transformers
      8. Motor-starting reactors and transformers

      1.4 These requirements do not cover transformers under the exclusive control of electrical utilities utilized for communication, metering, generation, control, transformation, transmission, and distribution of electric energy regardless of whether such transformers are located indoors, in buildings and rooms used exclusively by utilities for such purposes; or outdoors on property owned, leased, established rights on private property or on public rights of way (highways, streets, roads, and the like).

  • What is U.L. 1561?

      UL1561 covers 600 Volt Class Transformers:

      1.1 These requirements cover:

      1. General purpose and power transformers of the air-cooled, dry, ventilated, and non-ventilated types to be used in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. Construction types include step up, step down, insulating, and autotransformer type transformers as well as air-cooled and dry-type reactors

      OR

      1. General purpose and power transformers of the exposed core, air-cooled, dry, and compound-filled types rated more than 10 kVA to be used in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. Constructions include step up, step down, insulating, and autotransformer type transformers as well as air-cooled, dry, and compound-filled type reactors.

      1.2 These requirements do not cover ballasts for high intensity discharge (HID) lamps (metal halide, mercury vapor, and sodium types) or fluorescent lamps, exposed core transformers, compound-filled transformers, liquid-filled transformers, voltage regulators, general use or special types of transformers covered in requirements for other electrical equipment, autotransformers forming part of industrial control equipment, motor-starting autotransformers, variable voltage autotransformers, transformers having a nominal primary or secondary rating of more than 600 volts, or overvoltage taps rated greater than 660 volts.

      1.3 These requirements do not cover transformers provided with waveshaping or rectifying circuitry. Waveshaping or rectifying circuits may include components such as diodes and transistors. Components such as capacitors, transient voltage surge suppressors, and surge arresters are not considered to be waveshaping or rectifying devices.

  • What is ANSI C57.12.51?

      IEEE Standard for Ventilated Dry- Type Power Transformers, 501 kVA and Larger, Three-Phase, with High- Voltage 34.5 kV to 601 V and Low- Voltage 208Y/120 V to 4160 V covering General Requirements. The current standard was updated in 2008.

      This standard is intended to set forth characteristics relating to performance, limited electrical and mechanical interchangeability, and safety of the equipment described, and to assist in the proper selection of such equipment. Specific rating combinations are described in the range from 750/1000 to 7500/10 000 kVA inclusive, with high-voltage 601 to 34 500 volts inclusive and low-voltage 208Y/120 to 4160 volts inclusive. Part I of this standard describes certain electrical and mechanical requirements and takes into consideration certain safety features of 60-Hz, two-winding, three-phase, ventilated dry-type transformers with self-cooled ratings 501 kVA and larger, generally used for step-down purposes. Part Il describes other requirements or alternatives which may be specified for some applications and lists forced-air-cooled ratings for certain sizes.

  • What is RCBN – Reduced Capacity Below Nominal

      For transformer equipped with primary or secondary taps designed for RCBN, the customer is permitted to connect to a lower voltage tap (BELOW NOMINAL), provided that the customer load capacity (KVA) is also REDUCED so as to ensure that the rated winding current does not exceed its nominal value.

  • What is a Tap?
  • What is a Full Capacity Tap?

      A full capacity tap is one through which the transformer can deliver its rated kVA output without exceeding the specified temperature rise.

      Transformers may be designed with full capacity taps ABOVE or BELOW nominal (FCAN and FCBN, respectively). Full capacity taps allow for the input primary voltage to be increased or decreased from its nominal voltage while retaining its ability to deliver its rated kVA output without exceeding it’s specified temperature rise.

  • What is a Center Tap?

      It is a center point of a two winding transformer or a true tap in the middle winding of a coil. The voltage from the neutral to the center point will equal the voltage from the center point to end of the coil.

      For three phase units, the center tap is often limited to 5% of the total transformer kVA.

  • What are Primary Voltage Taps?

      In some cases, the actual supply voltage to the primary of the transformer is either slightly higher or lower than the nameplate rating. Taps are provided on most transformers on the primary winding to correct this condition and maintain full rated output voltage and capacity. Standard taps are usually in 2 1/2% or 5% increments.

      Example: The transformer has a 480V primary rating and the incoming voltage is at 504V. The primary connection should be made at the +5% tap in order to maintain the nominal secondary voltage.

  • What is a Mid-tap?
  • What does is a reconnectable transformer?

      A reconnectable transformer typically refers to a transformer with two primary connections. These may be used for mobile equipment, test transformers or to accommodate future voltage changes and upgrades in a facility without having to change the transformer. Depending on the difference in voltages and application reconnectable transformers may be exempt from current efficiency regulations.

  • What is NEMA ST 20?