Skip to main content

What is a Buck Boost transformer?

It is a two-winding, single-phase transformer with low voltage secondary windings, which can be connected as an autotransformer. Used to raise or lower single and three phase line voltages by 10 – 20%.

  • Should low voltage system be assessed for arc-flash hazards?

      IEEE 1584-2018 provides mathematical models for designers and facility operators to apply in determining the arc-flash hazard distance and the incident energy to which workers could be exposed during their work on or near electrical equipment.

      It generally indicates that systems with an available short circuit current of 2000 Amps or higher should be assessed for arc-flash potential. A rule of thumb would indicate that most systems fed by a 45 kVA or larger transformer will need to be assessed if impedance (%Z) of 45 kVA is less than 6%, 30 kVA if %Z is less than 4% or 15 kVA if %Z is less than 2%.

  • What is a Unit Substation Style Transformer (USST)?
  • What is U.L. 1561?

      UL1561 covers 600 Volt Class Transformers:

      1.1 These requirements cover:

      1. General purpose and power transformers of the air-cooled, dry, ventilated, and non-ventilated types to be used in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. Construction types include step up, step down, insulating, and autotransformer type transformers as well as air-cooled and dry-type reactors

      OR

      1. General purpose and power transformers of the exposed core, air-cooled, dry, and compound-filled types rated more than 10 kVA to be used in accordance with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70. Constructions include step up, step down, insulating, and autotransformer type transformers as well as air-cooled, dry, and compound-filled type reactors.

      1.2 These requirements do not cover ballasts for high intensity discharge (HID) lamps (metal halide, mercury vapor, and sodium types) or fluorescent lamps, exposed core transformers, compound-filled transformers, liquid-filled transformers, voltage regulators, general use or special types of transformers covered in requirements for other electrical equipment, autotransformers forming part of industrial control equipment, motor-starting autotransformers, variable voltage autotransformers, transformers having a nominal primary or secondary rating of more than 600 volts, or overvoltage taps rated greater than 660 volts.

      1.3 These requirements do not cover transformers provided with waveshaping or rectifying circuitry. Waveshaping or rectifying circuits may include components such as diodes and transistors. Components such as capacitors, transient voltage surge suppressors, and surge arresters are not considered to be waveshaping or rectifying devices.

  • What is ANSI C57.12.91?
  • What does LV stand for
  • What is a Dielectric System in a transformer
  • What is a Low Voltage General Purpose Transformer?

      HPS’s low voltage general-purpose transformers provide a safe, long lasting, highly reliable power source. They are designed for general lighting and other low voltage applications. They are UL listed and CSA certified.

  • What is the induction principle of transformers

      A transformer consists of laminated silicon steel cores on which one or more coils of wire have been wound. The two windings are electrically isolated from each other (with the exception of autotransformers) and usually have widely different numbers of turns.

      If the transformer primary is connected to an A.C. power source of suitable voltage, a small no-load current called the exciting current will flow into the coil and produce a magnetic flux in the iron core. Since the source is A.C., the flux will also be alternating. This alternating magnetic flux links the secondary turns and induces a small voltage in each turn. The induced volts per turn of the secondary windings adds to appear across the secondary terminals. It should be understood that the flux induces a voltage in each primary turn equal to that in each secondary turn. The difference between the total induced primary voltage and the applied voltage is approximately equal to the IR drop. The ratio of turns between the primary and secondary coils determines the output voltage.

  • When can you Reverse Connect a transformer

      In general, distribution transformers can be reverse connected without de-rating the nameplates KVA capacity. However, this is rarely considered in modern applications due to NEC code changes. Several precautions need to be taken for reverse connection of some smaller transformers. These would include:
      Dealing with higher current inrush which can cause nuisance tripping.

      HPS transformers under 6kVA three-phase and 3kVA single-phase, there is a “turns ratio compensation” on the low voltage winding. When backfed the turns compensation actually reduces the output voltage. When a three-phase transformer is reverse connected thus resulting in a Wye-Delta configuration, the neutral terminal must be isolated. This modification may violate the warranty and agency listings such as U.L.

      Back-fed transformers increase the installer’s liability since a future user may not realize what is the primary while de-energizing the transformer.

      In general HPS suggest that a proper step up transformer which is designed with the low voltage terminals as the primary terminal be used.

  • What is the energy efficiency regulation compliance in the U.S. and Canada?

      In the past several years, there has been an accelerated rate of change in updating energy efficiency standards for transformers in North America.

      Governments in US and Canada are encouraging users to use higher energy efficiency dry-type transformers, to help reduce carbon dioxide emissions. There is also a long term cost savings in operating higher efficiency transformers translated in lower energy usage, lower cooling cost, etc.

      In U.S.A. the Department of Energy (DOE) has mandated new higher efficiency levels effective Jan. 1st 2016.

      In Canada Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) published SOR/2016-311 which amends the Energy Efficiency Act to align the via amendment 14 the minimum energy efficiency levels for dry type transformers to the ones implemented by DOE in Jan 2016.

      The new NRCan 2019 regulation is going to be enforced across Canada on May 1st, 2019. The Ontario government already adopted these new efficiency levels by publishing the ON Reg.404-12 which in schedule 6 defines the new energy efficiency levels that dry type transformers sold in ON must comply with starting Jan.1st 2018 (Ontario Energy Efficiency Compliance).

      The rest of Canada (including Quebec) is still following the current energy efficiency levels prescribed by CSA C802.2, until the new NRCan regulations come in effect on May 1st 2019.

      To help our valued customers in estimating the cost savings resulting from upgrading their old dry type transformer to the new DOE2016/NRCan2019 efficiency levels, HPS has developed an Energy Savings Calculator available on its website. To find out how HPS can help reduce your energy consumption, click here.

      To visit the Canadian Gazette for more information about the Canadian energy efficiency standards, click here.

      For the Ontario Energy efficiency regulation please click here.

      To view an electronic copy of the U.S. DOE energy efficient standards, click here.

  • What is considered Low Voltage for distribution transformers?

      The term “Low Voltage” for electrical distribution transformers can refer to different voltages. Generally transformers with primary and secondary voltages at or below 600 volts are considered “Low Voltage”.

      • 690 Volts is sometimes considered low voltage. It is sometimes referred to as a 600/690 volt system.
      • The National Electric Code considers voltages <1000 volts to be low voltage.
      • Some regulatory agencies consider 1.2 kV and below to be low voltage.

      As a result there is some market confusion for voltages between 600 and 1200 volts with some regulations having a definition gap for some of these voltages.

  • What are High Voltage and Low Voltage windings?
  • What are the new Energy Efficiency levels coming for Transformers sold in the U.S.?

      Transformers have been and remain an essential part of our electrical infrastructure.  Everywhere we look there is a transformer supplying power to industrial, commercial or residential applications.

      In the past decades the greenhouse gas emissions and the effects on our planet have become the focus of many governments, agencies and individuals. Energy generation is a major contributor to the greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to widespread efforts to make energy generation more environmentally friendly, there is also a goal to lower energy consumption within most industrial, commercial and residential areas. Achieving increased energy efficiency levels for equipment and consumer products has become a priority for many manufacturers.

      Improving the energy efficiency of new transformers is a primary goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE), and they have the legal authority to define efficiency levels and enforce compliance.  Environmentally conscious consumers also recognize that buying a higher energy efficiency transformer will have a societal payback over many years.

      The Department of Energy has established new and more stringent Energy Efficiency levels for Transformers in the U.S. effective January 1st 2016.  The new efficiency levels for Medium Voltage Liquid-Filled, Medium Voltage and Low Voltage Dry-Type Distribution Transformers are defined in DOE’s CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) title 10 part 431.  Widely known as DOE 10 CFR p431, it was published in the Federal Register Vol. 78, No. 75 on Thursday April 18, 2013.  According to the DOE, the new efficiency levels are expected to reduce energy losses by an average of 18% in low-voltage dry-type distribution transformers and 13% for medium-voltage dry-type transformers, over the current TP-1 efficiency levels.

      To put the benefits of this change in perspective, the DOE projects savings up to $12.9 billion in total costs to consumers and 3.63 quadrillion Btu of energy over a 30 year period. In addition, about 265 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions will be avoided, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 52 million automobiles.

      The subject of energy efficiency for transformers raises two main considerations:

      1. Under normal operation a transformer is always on (typically at 35% average loading), making any energy efficiency improvements more significant over an extended period of time.  This means that customers will be rewarded in two manners:  they are reducing greenhouse gas emissions and there is an economic payback through reduced energy costs.  Considering the life expectancy of a transformer and the fact that the transformer will be on 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for the next 25-30 years, even small energy efficiency improvements will pay dividends for decades.  A secondary benefit is that more efficient transformers generate less heat, and in many cases this translates into lower costs to cool the environment in which they are utilized.
      2. The currently mandated energy efficiency levels are already hovering around the 98-99% mark, depending on the type of transformer and ratings.  This means that any further efficiency improvements become more challenging to achieve, typically requiring more and/or better core and conductor materials.  This will directly impact the cost of the transformer in most cases.  However, as noted in point 1 above, there is an economic benefit to offset the higher initial transformer costs.  The new DOE 2016 compliant transformers that will come on the market will also be somewhat heavier than the current TP-1 efficiency level transformers.

      Hammond Power Solutions (HPS) has an online Energy Savings Calculator to help to our customers determine the savings they can achieve by installing a higher efficiency transformer.  It includes a comparison of transformers with older efficiencies to those of higher efficiency (TP1, NEMA Premium and DOE 2016 in the future) as well as specifics of the application and the customer’s cost of energy.

      Currently, for applications that require higher energy efficiency than the DOE regulated TP-1 levels, industry is using Premium Efficiency transformers defined by the NEMA Premium Efficiency Guidelines that stipulate approximately 30% lower loses than the TP-1 levels.  In terms of the environmental benefits of using a NEMA Premium transformer over a TP-1 rated let’s look at an example:

      The Electricity savings resulting from upgrading one three phase 75 kVA transformer can be translated into one of the following:

      • 1.19 Metric Tons of CO2
      • 121 Gallons of Gasoline
      • About 1/6th of the energy used by an average household annually
      • Planting 28 Trees
      • 0.9 Acres of Forest
      • Recycling 0.34 Metric Tons of Waste
      • Savings of $166 per year at $0.12 per kW-Hr

      Forest image 

      At some kVA ratings NEMA Premium energy efficiency levels meet or slightly exceed the DOE 2016 levels, some are slightly below the new requirements.  However, the NEMA Premium products are optional within the market today, and many consumers do not take advantage of the benefits they afford.  Hence, the DOE will require that all transformers manufactured after January 1st, 2016 will meet the new efficiency levels.

      The environmental impact and savings for our customers resulting from the DOE changes are positive and significant.  HPS fully embraces and supports this change, and the environmental benefits our society will receive as a result.  We proudly offer high quality transformers meeting the most stringent Energy efficiency requirements today and will be in a position to support the migration to the new DOE 2016 higher-efficiency designs for our valued partners and customers, beginning in the latter half of 2015.

  • New Energy Efficiency levels US 2016

      Transformers have been and remain an essential part of our electrical infrastructure.  Everywhere we look there is a transformer supplying power to industrial, commercial or residential applications.

      In the past decades the greenhouse gas emissions and the effects on our planet have become the focus of many governments, agencies and individuals. Energy generation is a major contributor to the greenhouse gas emissions. In addition to widespread efforts to make energy generation more environmentally friendly, there is also a goal to lower energy consumption within most industrial, commercial and residential areas. Achieving increased energy efficiency levels for equipment and consumer products has become a priority for many manufacturers.

      Improving the energy efficiency of new transformers is a primary goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE), and they have the legal authority to define efficiency levels and enforce compliance.  Environmentally conscious consumers also recognize that buying a higher energy efficiency transformer will have a societal payback over many years.

      The Department of Energy has established new and more stringent Energy Efficiency levels for Transformers in the U.S. effective January 1st 2016.  The new efficiency levels for Medium Voltage Liquid-Filled, Medium Voltage and Low Voltage Dry-Type Distribution Transformers are defined in DOE’s CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) title 10 part 431.  Widely known as DOE 10 CFR p431, it was published in the Federal Register Vol. 78, No. 75 on Thursday April 18, 2013.  According to the DOE, the new efficiency levels are expected to reduce energy losses by an average of 18% in low-voltage dry-type distribution transformers and 13% for medium-voltage dry-type transformers, over the current TP-1 efficiency levels.

      To put the benefits of this change in perspective, the DOE projects savings up to $12.9 billion in total costs to consumers and 3.63 quadrillion Btu of energy over a 30 year period. In addition, about 265 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions will be avoided, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of about 52 million automobiles.

      The subject of energy efficiency for transformers raises two main considerations:

      (1) Under normal operation a transformer is always on (typically at 35% average loading), making any energy efficiency improvements more significant over an extended period of time.  This means that customers will be rewarded in two manners:  they are reducing greenhouse gas emissions and there is an economic payback through reduced energy costs.  Considering the life expectancy of a transformer and the fact that the transformer will be on 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for the next 25-30 years, even small energy efficiency improvements will pay dividends for decades.  A secondary benefit is that more efficient transformers generate less heat, and in many cases this translates into lower costs to cool the environment in which they are utilized.

      (2) The currently mandated energy efficiency levels are already hovering around the 98-99% mark, depending on the type of transformer and ratings.  This means that any further efficiency improvements become more challenging to achieve, typically requiring more and/or better core and conductor materials.  This will directly impact the cost of the transformer in most cases.  However, as noted in point 1 above, there is an economic benefit to offset the higher initial transformer costs.  The new DOE 2016 compliant transformers that will come on the market will also be somewhat heavier than the current TP-1 efficiency level transformers.

      Hammond Power Solutions (HPS) has an online Energy Savings Calculator to help to our customers determine the savings they can achieve by installing a higher efficiency transformer.  It includes a comparison of transformers with older efficiencies to those of higher efficiency (TP1, NEMA Premium and DOE 2016 in the future) as well as specifics of the application and the customer’s cost of energy.

      Currently, for applications that require higher energy efficiency than the DOE regulated TP-1 levels, industry is using Premium Efficiency transformers defined by the NEMA Premium Efficiency Guidelines that stipulate approximately 30% lower loses than the TP-1 levels.  In terms of the environmental benefits of using a NEMA Premium transformer over a TP-1 rated let’s look at an example:

      The Electricity savings resulting from upgrading one three phase 75 kVA transformer can be translated into one of the following:

      • 1.19 Metric Tons of CO2
      • 121 Gallons of Gasoline
      • About 1/6th of the energy used by an average household annually
      • Planting 28 Trees
      • 0.9 Acres of Forest
      • Recycling 0.34 Metric Tons of Waste
      • Savings of $166 per year at $0.12 per kW-Hr

      Dense Forest

       

      At some kVA ratings NEMA Premium energy efficiency levels meet or slightly exceed the DOE 2016 levels, some are slightly below the new requirements.  However, the NEMA Premium products are optional within the market today, and many consumers do not take advantage of the benefits they afford.  Hence, the DOE will require that all transformers manufactured after January 1st, 2016 will meet the new efficiency levels.

      The environmental impact and savings for our customers resulting from the DOE changes are positive and significant.  HPS fully embraces and supports this change, and the environmental benefits our society will receive as a result.  We proudly offer high quality transformers meeting the most stringent Energy efficiency requirements today and will be in a position to support the migration to the new DOE 2016 higher-efficiency designs for our valued partners and customers, beginning in the latter half of 2015.

  • Can a transformer be back-fed or used in reverse?

      In general, distribution transformers can be reverse connected without de-rating the nameplates KVA capacity. However, this is rarely considered in modern applications due to NEC code changes. Several precautions need to be taken for reverse connection of some smaller transformers. These would include:
      Dealing with higher current inrush which can cause nuisance tripping.

      HPS transformers under 6kVA three-phase and 3kVA single-phase, there is a “turns ratio compensation” on the low voltage winding. When backfed the turns compensation actually reduces the output voltage.
      When a three-phase transformer is reverse connected thus resulting in a Wye-Delta configuration, the neutral terminal must be isolated. This modification may violate the warranty and agency listings such as U.L.

      Back-fed transformers increase the installer’s liability since a future user may not realize what is the primary while de-energizing the transformer.

      In general HPS suggest that a proper step up transformer which is designed with the low voltage terminals as the primary terminal be used.

  • What is a Buck Boost transformer?
  • What are solar transformers?

      Solar transformers covers a broad selection of transformers which are designed for the unique requirements of a solar power system. These transformers can include solar inverter transformers, grid tie transformers and zig-zag autotransformers or isolation transformers specially designed to be used in grounding banks for utility hook-ups. Transformers used to directly deliver power to utilities must often be capable of bidirectional current flow.

  • What is a solar grounding bank?
  • What is ANSI C57.12.01?
  • What is NEMA ST 20?
  • What is Subtractive Polarity

      The relative polarities of voltages on single phase transformers is important when using the two units in parallel or connecting two or three units to create a three phase bank. Most single phase transformers are wired in Additive Polarity. Visualize two primary terminals H1 and H2 on top of a square representing a single phase transformer. Now visualize two secondary terminals, X1 and X2. If X2 is on the left size and X1 is on the right side, (reading X2 – X1 left to right) then this would be additive polarity. If the terminal X1 is on the left side and X2 is on the right side (reading X1-X2 left to right) then this would be subtractive polarity.

      Most single phase wiring diagrams have a dot on both the primary and secondary sides, typically on the H1 and X1 terminals. This dot represents the matching polarity on the primary and secondary sides of the single phase transformer. When wiring single phase units in parallel or banking, the polarities of the transformers used must be kept consistent.

  • What is Additive Polarity

      The relative polarities of voltages on single phase transformers is important when using the two units in parallel or connecting two or three units to create a three phase bank. Most single phase transformers are wired in Additive Polarity. Visualize two primary terminals H1 and H2 on top of a square representing a single phase transformer. Now visualize two secondary terminals, X1 and X2. If X2 is on the left size and X1 is on the right side, (reading X2 – X1 left to right) then this would be additive polarity. If the terminal X1 is on the left side and X2 is on the right side (reading X1-X2 left to right) then this would be subtractive polarity.

      Most single phase wiring diagrams have a dot on both the primary and secondary sides, typically on the H1 and X1 terminals. This dot represents the matching polarity on the primary and secondary sides of the single phase transformer. When wiring single phase units in parallel or banking, the polarities of the transformers used must be kept consistent.

  • What Type of Fuses are Recommended for HPS Control Transformers?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of an open delta transformer configuration ?

      Open-delta configurations are typically deployed by utilities, typically to loads with little single-phase requirements.

      Advantages:

      • Open-deltas only require the utility to install two transformers.
      • Future Capacity can be increased by simply installing a third similar sized transformer verses installing 2-3 larger transformers.

      Disadvantages:

      • While the line to line voltages will be equal, the line to neutral voltages will have two phases being equal and one phase being 1.732 times larger.
      • Unbalanced single phase loads can cause voltage fluctuations and additional, uneven transformer heating.
      • An open delta connection only has 58% of the capacity of a full set of three transformers, that is a 42% decrease in actual capacity event though the installed capacity only drops by 33%.

       

  • What is Parallel Operation?

      Single and three phase transformers may be operated in parallel by connecting similarly marked terminals, provided their ratios, voltages, resistances, reactance and ground connections are designed to permit parallel operation. Current and voltage angular displacements are also required to be the same in the case of three phase transformers.

  • What is a Scott T Connection?
  • Can a transformer convert single-phase power to three-phase power?

      Single-phase power can be derived from a three-phase source. Transformers cannot convert a single-phase source to a three-phase source. The typical method to convert single-phase power to three-phase power is to utilize devices generally termed as rotary or static phase converters.

  • What does the dot mean on a single phase transformer wiring schematic?

      Typically, a single phase transformer wiring schematic has a dot on both the primary and secondary windings.

      The placement of these dots next to the ends of the primary and secondary windings informs us that the instantaneous voltage polarity seen across the primary winding will be the same across the secondary winding. In other words, the phase shift from primary to secondary will be zero degrees, which is important for some types of circuits. If the wiring to the dots is reversed on one side, the primary and secondary will be 180 degrees out of phase.

  • Explain Balance Loading on Single and Three Phase Transformers?

      A single-phase transformer with a series/parallel 120/240V secondary winding has two separate 120V secondary windings and is usually connected into a 3-wire system. When the winders are wired in series for 240 VAC, 120 VAC can be obtained at either between the neutral and centerpoint or between the centerpoint and 240VAC. If both 240 VAC and 120 VAC are going to be used, care must be exercised in distributing the load on the two 120V windings evenly, so each winding is carrying about half of the total 120VAC load if the 120 VAC load exceeds 5% of the total tranformer rating.

      Similarly for a three-phase transformer, each phase should be considered as a single-phase transformer. When distributing single-phase loads between the three phases, each of the three windings should be evenly loaded with single phase loads.

      Failure to balance loads can cause secondary voltage imbalances, additional transformer losses and high neutral currents. Significantly unbalanced loads can reduce the life of a transformer.

  • What is the duty cycle of a transformer?

      Duty cycle is the amount of load over set periods of time. Transformers are designed to run continuously at full load without exceeding the insulation temperature limits provided that parameters such as ambient temperature, harmonic distortion, power factor, etc., are met. Transformers can also be designed to run for short term duty cycles which may result in a smaller unit. Short term duty cycles will need lower or no-load periods to aid in cooling. High load duty cycles can affect parameters such as impedance and voltage regulation.

  • Explain the term Phase?
  • What is a triplex transformer?

      A triplex transformer is composed of three separate single phase transformers which are banked and connected directly together to form a single three phase unit in a common enclosure. While slightly larger than a dedicated three phase unit. a triplex design can be broken down into three significantly smaller and lighter components when there are size and/or weight restrictions for transporting the transformer. These are often used in mining or high rise building installations where the unit must be transported in an elevator.

  • Where is a Scott-T Transformer used

      Typical applications for a Scott-T transformer include:

      • Used in an electric furnace installation where it is needed to operate two single-phase feeds and draw a balanced load from the three-phase supply.
      • Used to supply the single phase loads such as traction power. This helps to keep the load on the three-phase system as nearly balanced as possible.
      • Used to link a 3-phase system with a two–phase system with the flow of power in either direction.

      The Scott-T connection permits conversions of a 3-phase system to a two-phase system or vice versa. Since 2-phase generators are not available, the conversion from two phases to three phases is not a practical application.

  • Do different types of non-linear loads generate different harmonics?

      By far the majority of today’s non-linear loads are rectifiers with DC smoothing capacitors. These rectifiers typically come in 3 types:
      (i) single phase, line-to-neutral
      (ii) single phase, phase-to-phase
      (iii) three-phase

      Single-phase line-to-neutral rectifier loads, such as switch-mode power supplies in computer equipment, generate current harmonics 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th and higher. The 3rd will be the most predominant and typically the most troublesome. 3rd, 9th and other odd multiples of the 3rd harmonic are often referred to as triplen harmonics and because they add arithmetically in the neutral are also considered zero sequence currents. Line-to-neutral non-linear loads can be found in computer data centers, telecom rooms, broadcasting studios, schools, financial institutions, etc.

      208V single-phase rectifier loads can also produce 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th and higher harmonic currents but if they are reasonably balanced across the 3 phases, the amplitude of 3rd and 9th will be small. Because they are connected line-line, these loads cannot contribute to the neutral current. The largest current and voltage harmonics will generally be the 5th followed by the 7th. Typical single phase, 208V rectifier loads include the switch-mode power supplies in computer equipment and peripherals.

      Three-phase rectifier loads are inherently balanced and therefore generally produce very little 3rd and 9th harmonic currents unless their voltage supply is unbalanced. Their principle harmonics are the 5th and 7th with 11th and 13th also present. They cannot produce neutral current because they are not connected to the neutral conductor. The rectifiers of variable speed drives and Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS) are typical examples of three-phase rectifier loads.

      More Harmonic Mitigating Transformer Frequently Asked Questions

  • Can a Scott-T connected transformer be fed to go from two phases to three phases?

      In theory, you can feed a Scott-T connected transformer with two phase power and derive three phases. However, the two phase feed would need to have the two phases offset by 90 degrees. In practicality, there are no two phase generators on the market that can provide this feed.

      In some cases, this is discussed with an open delta system. Since an open delta system does not have the two phases offset by 90 degrees, a Scott T connected transformers can not be used in this application.

  • Can a Scott-T connected transformer be fed from two phases of an open delta system to create a three phase system?

      No. The two phase input of a Scott-T connected transformer requires the two phases to be offset by 90 degrees. Since an open delta system does not have the two phases offset by 90 degrees, a Scott-T connected transformer can not be used in this application. There are currently no practical magnetics solutions to this application.

  • Can Buck-Boost transformers be used on 3 phase systems?
  • Should Buck-Boost transformers be used to develop 3-phase 4 wire Wye circuits from 3-phase 3 wire Delta circuits?

      No – a three-phase “Wye” buck-boost transformer connection should be used only on a 4-wire source of supply. A delta to Wye connection does not provide adequate current capacity to accommodate unbalanced currents fl owing in the neutral wire of the 4-wire circuit.

  • What is an Open Delta transformer?

      An open delta transformer is a three phase transformer that only has two primary and secondary windings, with one side of the delta phase diagram “open”. Open delta transformers are rare and are typically only used for small loads where cost is important. More common is critical loads being wired with three single phase transformers in a banked configuration. Should one of these transformers fail, the three phase circuit can remain active although the two remaining transformers are limited to about 57% of the total load. This allows a circuit to remain powered during a failure of a transformer, albeit at a lower overall load factor.

      Open Delta